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Toradol - Uses - Dosages - Side Effects - Precautions

Toradol: Frequently Asked Questions Answered

What Is Toradol?

Toradol (generic name: ketorolac) is a prescription non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It’s not a narcotic, addictive, but it is a very strong NSAID and can lead to serious side effects. Dose of Toradol is not recommended for long periods. NSAIDs decrease prostaglandins, substances in the body that cause inflammation, and are therefore used to decrease inflammation, fever, and swelling.

What Are The Uses Of Toradol?

Toradol or ketorolac tromethamine, which belongs to the pharmacological class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), is usually used after specific medical procedures or surgery to treat moderately severe pain and inflammation. Toradol blocks the production of prostaglandins, natural compounds that cause fever and inflammation. It is a prescription drug and, as a precaution, not recommended for mild or long-term painful conditions (arthritis, for instance).

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What Are The Side Effects Of Toradol?

Some of the more common side effects of Toradol include visible water retention, indigestion, nausea, stomach cramps, diarrhea, as well as dizziness, drowsiness, and headache.

Some people experience reactions at the site of injection. The not-so-common side effects include skin rash, itching, excessive sweating, increased hunger, constipation, and vomiting. If you experience any of these symptoms, get in touch with a medical professional as a precaution.

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Toradol

1. How long for toradol injection to work?

Toradol (ketorolac tromethamine) belongs to the pharmacological class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and effectively treats moderate to severe pain. A dose of this prescription drug works rather quickly -- about 15 minutes after administration, and its effects can last up to 6 hours. It's often prescribed for post-surgery pain.

2. How long after toradol can I take ibuprofen?

As a word of precaution, do not take medicines such as ibuprofen when you are on a dose of Toradol as combining ketorolac with ibuprofen may increase the risk of side effects in the gastrointestinal tract as bleeding, ulceration, inflammation, and rarely, perforation.

3. Is toradol an opioid?

Toradol is a powerful and effective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is not a narcotic. As it is a pain-reliever, it is often confused with morphine, which is an opioid. Toradol is not addictive but can lead to serious side effects and therefore needs to be taken only in consultation with a doctor.

4. Can you mix toradol and decadron in the same syringe?

Using Decadron (which is dexamethasone) with Toradol (ketorolac) is not recommended as this mixture may increase the risk of side effects such as inflammation, ulceration, bleeding, and perforation (though rare).

5. Is toradol an NSAID?

NSAID is short for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. NSAIDs decrease prostaglandins, substances in the body that cause inflammation, and are therefore used to reduce inflammation, fever, and swelling. Toradol (generic name: ketorolac) is a strong NSAID. It’s not a narcotic, nor is it addictive, but it is a prescription NSAID.

6. Is toradol good for kidney stones?

Doctors may prescribe Toradol – a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug -- for kidney stones. This medication works as a pain reliever by helping to relax the muscle spasms that trap kidney stones. Toradol is a powerful anti-inflammatory medication.

7. Can toradol cause miscarriage?

As a precaution, Toradol is usually avoided in pregnancy. Doctors recommend Toradol for pregnant women only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Nursing mothers should not take Toradol because it is excreted in breast milk.

8. Can toradol cause nosebleeds?

Some of the more common side effects of Toradol include visible water retention, indigestion, nausea, stomach cramps, diarrhea, as well as dizziness, drowsiness, and headache. But if you notice frequent nosebleeds, unexplained bruising, or black stools, seek out a medical professional.

9. Is toradol a narcotic?

Toradol is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). NSAIDs are used to decrease inflammation, fever, and swelling. Toradol (generic name: ketorolac) is a potent NSAID and is sometimes prescribed post-surgery. Toradol is not a narcotic, nor is it addictive. It is a prescription NSAID.

10. Is toradol stronger than ibuprofen?

Both Toradol (ketorolac tromethamine) and ibuprofen are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used to treat pain. Toradol is more effective than ibuprofen. Toradol is used to treat moderately severe inflammation. Ibuprofen, on the other hand, is used to relieve mild to moderate pain.

For the last three decades, Yashoda Group of Hospitals has been providing quality healthcare, guided by the needs of patients and delivered by the best medical expertise. If you have any questions regarding the use of Toradol or any other drug, do give us a call. Our experts are always ready to help.

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References
  1. Drugs.com
  2. Rxlist.com

Disclaimer: The information provided herein is accurate, updated and complete as per the best practices of the Company. Please note that this information should not be treated as a replacement for physical medical consultation or advice. We do not guarantee the accuracy and the completeness of the information so provided. The absence of any information and/or warning to any drug shall not be considered and assumed as an implied assurance of the Company. We do not take any responsibility for the consequences arising out of the aforementioned information and strongly recommend you for a physical consultation in case of any queries or doubts.

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